Love, Blood & Rhetoric
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lilprince:

crazyfoalrus:

Home made TARDIS console room in Australia by J.P. Fox

one day I will have a console room…


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odditiesoflife:

An eccentric wealthy civil servant, Louis Mantin, wrote a will stating that his house was to be closed then reopened to the public a hundred years after his death, shedding light on how people lived back in the 19th century. This peek into life a century ago shows a world of opulence and change. Electricity and hot running water were new phenomena in houses, as were indoor toilets. The living areas were made for women who wore long skirts and sat sewing or at other gentle pursuits while men’s spaces were big and dark and bold.
Louis Mantin’s bedroom is a jewel of opulence with its carved four poster bed, but most extreme are the walls covered in gilded leather. This material was made in 1812 and covered in silver leaf, then varnished in yellow to give it a golden look.
The bed in the Ladies Salon was hung with curtains in the same pink material the walls are covered in. Called “Four Seasons”, Allaire’s room was extremely feminine, with painted ornamentation above every door showing seasonal scenes.
Wanting the best of everything, Mantin’s was the first house in Moulins to have electricity, and one of the only ones to have hot and cold running water as well as toilets on each floor.

The electric lamp shown here came from the catholic church. The assistant curator says: “Mantin wanted to have comfort—he was very interested in modernization.”

Mantin was interested in all sorts of eclectic things, and in his house you could find not only the stuffed wolf but also a diorama of real dead frogs fighting a duel in a glass globe. There is also a rat playing a violin and a stuffed blowfish.
The toilet is porcelain covered with wood, and the bath of course is a modern (for the time) version of the hip bath. The screen in front of the fire was intended to prevent drafts when people were soaking in the warm tub.
The formal living room is opulent in the extreme! It contains marble-topped tables, a chandelier, embroidered chairs, and rather than the usual mirror above the fire place, there is a window into the next room
Although the house is stunning, Mantin only partially set out what he intended to show. He did indeed conceal his home for 100 years to reveal the dramatic differences between houses of today and his house from a century ago. However since Mantin was rich and owned a mansion, he is only showing how rich people lived in opulence 100 years ago. This is certainly not how most people lived then.

(Source: environmentalgraffiti.com)


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the-gas-station:

Ani, the city of a thousand and one churches

Via The Atlantic In Focus

Situated on the eastern border of Turkey, across the Akhurian River from Armenia, lies the empty, crumbling site of the once-great metropolis of Ani, known as “the city of a thousand and one churches.” Founded more than 1,600 years ago, Ani was situated on several trade routes, and grew to become a walled city of more than 100,000 residents by the 11th century. In the centuries that followed, Ani and the surrounding region were conquered hundreds of times — Byzantine emperors, Ottoman Turks, Armenians, nomadic Kurds, Georgians, and Russians claimed and reclaimed the area, repeatedly attacking and chasing out residents. By the 1300s, Ani was in steep decline, and it was completely abandoned by the 1700s. Rediscovered and romanticized in the 19th century, the city had a brief moment of fame, only to be closed off by World War I and the later events of the Armenian Genocide that left the region an empty, militarized no-man’s land. The ruins crumbled at the hands of many: looters, vandals, Turks who tried to eliminate Armenian history from the area, clumsy archaeological digs, well-intentioned people who made poor attempts at restoration, and Mother Nature herself.

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thehappysorceress:

steampunktendencies:

Steampunk Bathroom

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Well.

We were planning to redo the sink/vanity, anyway

As designed by Bloody Stupid Johnson.


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s-h-e-e-r:

an image of the supremely photogenic biodomes at the Eden Project in Cornwall, UK
Biodomes by benjeev on Flickr.

s-h-e-e-r:

an image of the supremely photogenic biodomes at the Eden Project in Cornwall, UK

Biodomes by benjeev on Flickr.


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patrickschierer:

The Eden Project. Cornwall.


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The Eden Project

An educational charity and social enterprise, the Eden Project’s valuable research into plants and conservation has been taking place at the biomes at St.Austell, Cornwall, since 1999. What was once a disused kaolinite quarry is now a popular destination for families, schools and anyone interested in conservation.

The most well know images of the Eden Project are the world’s largest greenhouses, or biomes, that house the Rainforest (humid) and Mediterranean (warm) flora and fauna. The domes consist of hundreds of hexagonal and pentagonal, inflated, plastic cells supported by steel frames.


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angelophile:

Casa Batlló interiors, Barcelona, designed by Antoni Gaudí.


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angelophile:

Casa Batlló, Barcelona, designed by Antoni Gaudí.


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echoing-artemis:

breathless-ness:

thegodofdrunks:

lancmike:

nomellamesfriki:

Vistas aéreas

This is awesome!

I’m pretty sure that last one is Santiago, Chile. It’s a beautiful city.

I could stare at these forever

Oh man I LOVE the second one - what an awesome design - apparently it’s Barcelona? I don’t remember it anything like that and now I want to go back xD

Yeah, the Eixample part of Barcelona was a later addition to the more natural layout of the city in the late 19th century and was pretty visionary, influencing a lot of city design since. Ildefons Cerdà was the architect behind it and incorporated essentials like hospitals and markets being located equally on the grid. Gaudi’s obviously the most famous architect to have designed blocks in the Eixample. It’s kinda fascinating to see it from the air like that, though.

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(Source: ikarost)


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flafibani:

Portmeirion in North Wales is one of those places that you simply must visit in your life. Testament to one man’s dream - this is an architectural folly, an Italianate village built over a period of 50 years by architect Sir Clough Williams Ellis. He bought the land in the 1920s, and over the next five decades, he turned his fantastic vision into reality.


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evocativesynthesis:


 Staircase by Jukka Björn