Angelophile
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Frankly put. I am a FAKE GEEK GUY. I admit it. I like geek stuff, but I don’t love geek stuff. Not the way most geeks do. I’m an interloper on the geek scene. I’ve seen the movies, but I don’t know the canon. I am not a true fan.

All those things about not really loving the source material and “just watching the movies” or only reading the one book that everyone has read. That—all of that—applies to me.

But here are some things that have never happened to me. I have never been quizzed about who Data’s evil brother is to prove I like Star Trek. I have never had to justify my place in a midnight line to see Spider-man II by knowing who took up the mantle of Spider-man after Peter Parker’s death. (Peter Parker dies? Really? That’s so sad!) I have never had to explain who Nightwing is in order to participate in a conversation about Batman. (Nightwing is like….Robin on steroids, right?) I have never been asked how battle meditation works in order to voice my opinion that Enterprise shields would probably make a fight with Star Wars technology one sided. (Battle meditation is something that was in that Jedi role playing game, wasn’t it?) I have never had to beat everybody in the room (twice) at Mario Kart to prove I liked video games. I have never had my gender “honorarily” changed by having enough geek interests to be accepted (“you’re one of the guys now”). No one has ever insisted I tell them the difference between a tank and DPS in an MMORPG before allowing me to discuss raiding Molten Core. I have never been dismissed as a faker at a prequel screening because I didn’t know which admiral came out of light speed too close to the planet’s surface in The Empire Strikes Back. I have never been quizzed about Armor Class in order to get past someone who was blocking my path to the back of a game store where my friends were waiting at the tables. I have never been told I’m not a real fan. I have never been shamed for coming to a convention despite my lack of esoteric knowledge. And I have never, ever, EVER been invited to leave a fandom because I didn’t like [whatever it was] enough.

Every one of the things I have listed, I have personally witnessed happen. To women.

That’s not elitism. That’s sexism.

The “Fake Geek” is Not The Problem When It Comes to “Fake Geek Girls” (via brutereason)

I’m geekier than this guy, I think, but only in certain contexts. I write part time for a role-playing line, but I don’t play video games, I’ve never seen an episode of Game of Thrones, and…well, I won’t go through an exhaustive list. But to be clear: if I’m at a comic book event? I’m the fake geek. I’m there for the sake of a member of the opposite sex who knows more about that stuff than I do. And nobody’s ever going to call me on it because I’m a dude and I wear the uniform (small beard, nerdy t-shirt). And, yeah, that’s sexism.

(via turhansbeycompany)


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shobogan:

alltheladiesyouhate:

bang-a-rang-rufio:

despondentparamour:

mistress-of-all-wanderlust:

despondentparamour:

hufflepunkk:

AU where Kitty Pryde goes back instead of Logan and saves the world

wait did I say au I meant actual canon

#preach

I still think they did a good job.

Of course they did a good job with the movie. It’s the best X-Men movie they’ve ever graced us with. Competing with Captain America 2 for best Marvel movie of the year. I can’t even decide. 

But this isn’t about whether they did a good job or not. I know you saw High School Musical, this is about, stick to the status quo. We had the opportunity for the first female led Marvel movie since Elektra lulz and they chose to diminish Kitty’s role in her own goddamn story. Days Of Future Past was the first time Kitty Pryde had a big starring role in X-Men comics. So. Did this movie work? Well fuck yeah. Obviously. Would I have liked to see them sticking to actual canon? Well fuck yeah. Obviously.

Okay I agree it would have been awesome to see Kitty as the lead, but you also have to look at the cinematic structure they created for the X-Men universe. If these last two films were reboots, and not within the same universe, then Kitty could have gone back because they could have rectified the timeline. But based on what they were given, she would have been negative 20 years old and thus her conscious self would be unable to transport that far back in time. They still had a very strong female presence, and while Kitty wasn’t the lead I feel they did put the lead role largely on Mystique and her character growth.

idea: change method of time travel to allow kitty to be the logical choice to go back into the past

correction: female presence in dofp was awful. mystique was the only female character with considerable screentime, 80% of the screentime was white male characters. the leads were charles, hank, logan, erik and mystique who were also the antagonists. quicksilver got more screentime than kitty, who was basically relegated to the hodgepodge of side characters (who were largely women and poc and had about 2 lines each… imagine that). kitty replacing logan as the lead would have only just barely balanced it out imho and without that consideration it was skewed waaaay towards the men

look. look. the very best thing you can say about dofp is that it didn’t have ZERO female characters. there is no argument you can make for it having a strong female presence (much like the new hobbit films). having one speaking woman in an ensemble of 5-10 is not a “strong female presence”. 

And it’s not like they didn’t change the method anyway. Since when can Kitty send people back in time? It would have been just as easy to change it so people travelled physically.

Why not send Charles or Erik, then? It’s pretty common, in time travel, that meeting yourself is a bad fucking idea. Even if they’re trying to alter time, they could say that, specifically, is dangerous. It would have worked fine, because time travel isn’t real and they make the rules.

Logan wasn’t the protagonist because it was the only way the movie could have worked. Logan was the protagonist because he’s a straight white dude.

Nothing changes the fact that they took a story about oppression, persecution, and genocide which starred a Jewish girl and gave it to him instead.


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Wonders Never Cease

newageamazon:

You just have to say the word.  Just say it and claim it for yourself without any kind of tempering or any stipulations to soften the blow.

All you have to do is admit that you’re a feminist and you will be treated to some of the most degrading, insulting and abusive insults you can imagine.  “Bitch” and “feminazi” are the low end of the spectrum. And it goes all the way up to threats of rape, physical harm and even death. 

Not because you’ve done anything.  You’ve hurt no one, you’ve espoused no hurtful views.  You’ve simply said you were a feminist.  That you support the idea of equality between the sexes.

There are people who will hunt down women on the internet who apply that label to themselves specifically to throw those insults at them, to “put them in their place,” to frighten them.  To make them take back that one simple word.  They’re not even necessarily attacking the goal of equality, but they don’t want you to say “feminist.”

It works.  Over and over again you see or hear women say things like “I’m not a feminist, but…” and go on to express a staunchly feminist view point.  Women fervently declining the title over and over.  Don’t you call me that, don’t you say that word, they’ll hear me, they’ll hear you, they’ll make us pay for it.  Women who may want the title, who will own it in their mind are told by those around them not to dare apply it to themselves.  Don’t say that’s what you are.  You know what they’ll think of you.  You want to be liked?  You want a career?  You want good things? Then don’t say THAT WORD.

Diana of Themyscira, Wonder Woman, is not a woman to give into fear.

Wonder Woman would not reject the term “feminist.” 

She would EMBRACE it.

Introduced to a culture that embraces the ideas of equality, but rejects a term that applies to those who fight for it, she would be confused.  She would possible be horrified by this kind of thing in Patriarch’s World.  And I do not believe for one moment she would allow it to stop her.

She would have studied logic, I’m sure.  Feminists believe in equality between the sexes.  I believe in equality between the sexes.  Therefor, I am a feminist.

If you attempt to tell me that Wonder Woman would say she was not a feminist, that she would qualify a statement with “…not really a feminist, but…,” then I will tell you the simple truth.  You do not understand Wonder Woman, what she stands for, who she is.

You dishonor her.

She is a feminist.

I am a feminist.

End of story.

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Ever hear the term “SJW”? It means “social justice warrior,” and it refers specifically to people who point out racism or sexism in movies, video games, and other pop culture. Those people are considered worse than other types of critics because instead of just pointing out that a movie has flaws, they’re accusing people who like it of being awful.

Except they’re not, of course. If someone points out that the alternator belt in your car is slipping, they’re not accusing you of being some kind of mustache-twirling, white cat-stroking supervillain for having car problems. They’re not accusing you of anything. They’re talking about your fucking car.

J. F. Sargent, “5 Human Flaws That Prevent Progress and Keep Us Dumb" (Cracked.com)

I don’t know what’s been happening over at Cracked lately, but damn.

(via thetrekkiehasthephonebox)


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IT WAS THE HUMAN RACE, ON THE PLANET EARTH, WITH THE NUCLEAR DETERRENT

kierongillen:

(I had some people ask me about my comic crit. Hearing Wait What discuss JUDGE DREDD: AMERICA reminded me I wrote an essay about it at some point… and I’ve no idea where. I thought it may have been Panel Bleed, which had me nosing through archive.org, trying to find it. But there’s some stuff there, which I think it’s worth pulling a piece from. Here’s one…) 

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WHEN THE WIND BLOWS
Raymond Briggs

I know one thing for certain: My parents never read the blurb.

In the potted biography of creator Raymond Briggs’, among explaining his many achievements, it describes how he has created several illustrated books “for children”. This, it states, is his first “for adults”.

When the Wind Blows was released in 1982. I was seven. It was, and I only realise this as I’m typing it right now, the first cultural item specifically designed for adults that I ever experienced. It provided my childish mind with its first real images of Armageddon.

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Put aside the fantastic cover, which with its glorious mushroom cloud looming above the innocent Rich-Tea-Biscuit faced-forms of Jim and Hilda, the story’s principles. As a child I knew – and it’s something that I can’t quite shake to this day – that explosions were cool. It’s always fun to see something explode, and nothing in all creation has ever exploded with the panache of an atom bomb.

But an explosion isn’t the end of the world. The bang comes, and then the whimper. When The Wind Blows is all whimper. Tellingly, in the story, there’s no actual distant view of the atom bomb. When Tom and Hilda’s world is torn apart, with them sheltering beneath an unscrewed door, we’re presented with a double-page spread of pure white, fading to red around the edges. The next two pages, the dense panel layout slowly reinforces itself, reality returning. A voice emerges from beneath the wood: “Blimey”.

We don’t see the bomb for the same reason that there’s that much commented problem with the woods and the trees. You need perspective to realise that… and in a nuclear war, there is no place far enough away to gain perspective. You’re there, at ground zero.

Now, Eighties culture, pop or otherwise, lived under the Shadow of the bomb (tm). As such, many of its artefacts can seem ridiculous when cast beneath post-cold war eyes. The Paranoia that seeped through every image is just laughable. All that worry for nothing.

(Which forgets that is just an illusion of our linear lives. How lucky were we to get out of the cold war alive? We’ll never know. After surviving Russian roulette, it’s all too easy to shrug and claim that you were never in danger. After all, the gun didn’t fire.)

But When The Wind Blow’s power lingers when other comic works – say, Watchmen – are tarnished. It gains power from its non-specificity, its detail. Tom and Hilda are an average, ageing couple. Their views are somewhat conservative. They’re not too bright. As the three minute warning comes in, Hilda worries more about getting the washing in than the imminent nuclear destruction. They’re your grandparents, essentially.

They live in a house, in the countryside. The other characters are dismissed in the first panel when Tom gets off the bus, leaving them entirely alone. He’s returning from reading the papers about the rising national tensions. Home, he follows the safety leaflets about how to construct an inner-core out of door-frames, which will ensure they survive. Much black comedy, ensues, as they wrestle with the contradictory rules – memorably, being told to close all the doors to prevent spread of fires after already using them to construct their shelter. Hilda, especially, doesn’t really understand the seriousness of the events.

Then the bomb goes off.

And then, across the remainder of the books, the pair slowly die of radiation poisoning.

I’m sorry, this is nuclear war, not a murder mystery. Spoilers don’t apply. It was the Human Race on the Planet Earth with the Nuclear Deterrent.

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Much like Briggs’ other work, it takes full advantage of the oversized European format (aka Children’s Illustration Book) to provide a dense panel. The drama between Tom and Hilda takes place in up to twenty-eight panel grids, tiny painted people living their lives and saying dumb things and quietly loving. Tom feels secure in the information and wants to have a cup of tea, even though the water’s been off since the bombs went up (or down, he can’t remember). Hilda worries about the total mess the place finds itself in and her hair falling out.

Then, as the story progresses, Briggs takes us to a full double page spread, showing in shadowy shapes the huge machines that are mobilising in distant lands. The contrast between the microscopic tiny chatter of their lives, and the gargantuan forces that crush them is hugely powerful – and never more so than the central explosion described earlier. It was the first comic sequence to genuinely lodge itself in my mind.

It wasn’t just an explosion, I realised. It was the end of the world.

Thanks to When The Wind Blows, I knew the difference.

Yeah, when people talk about reading Watchmen for the first time, or Arkham Asylum, or Sandman or whatever, as the comic that affected them most… well, for me it was When The Wind Blows. I first read it when I was about 11 or 12 years old and it destroyed me.


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autonomousartisan:

mizuaoi:

hinoneko:

we all start somewhere

I really wish the cosplay community would calm the fuck down and realize this. 

I don’t think enough cosplayers remember this at all. It is ridiculous.  That’s why a few friends of mine, along with myself, love to hang out with newer cosplays. I even do photoshoots and allow any cosplayer to join them for free. I don’t care who you are, where you are from, or what your “level of cosplay” is. As long as you are nice, I will be nice.
And every cosplayer should be like that. Especially if they want to call themselves a hero of cosplay.

We all start somewhere and we all stop somewhere too. Plenty of us find our level and don’t have the practical or creative skills to be compared to incredible costume designers and armorers and practical prop builders. There’s plenty of us who have to make use of what we can pick up off the shelf to help us represent a character we love and that’s okay too. Kids can get through on enthusiasm, but you know what? So can adults. 
I’m in my late thirties and can’t sew for shit, not through lack of trying, but lack of skill, and couldn’t dream of creating a costume from scratch. There’s plenty of cosplayers half my age who eclipse me in terms of skill. And that’s great. There’s room for everyone of all levels, from people whose cosplay consists of matching store-bought clothing with their favorite character, to people who sew body suits, to people who manufacture entire dragons from worbia and everyone in between. However you show your love for a character it’s great and if anyone looks down on you for ‘not trying hard enough’ then they’re the ones that are open for criticism, not you. 
Short version: The real ‘heroes of cosplay’ are each and every one who gives it a go.

autonomousartisan:

mizuaoi:

hinoneko:

we all start somewhere

I really wish the cosplay community would calm the fuck down and realize this. 

I don’t think enough cosplayers remember this at all. It is ridiculous.  That’s why a few friends of mine, along with myself, love to hang out with newer cosplays. I even do photoshoots and allow any cosplayer to join them for free. I don’t care who you are, where you are from, or what your “level of cosplay” is. As long as you are nice, I will be nice.

And every cosplayer should be like that. Especially if they want to call themselves a hero of cosplay.

We all start somewhere and we all stop somewhere too. Plenty of us find our level and don’t have the practical or creative skills to be compared to incredible costume designers and armorers and practical prop builders. There’s plenty of us who have to make use of what we can pick up off the shelf to help us represent a character we love and that’s okay too. Kids can get through on enthusiasm, but you know what? So can adults. 

I’m in my late thirties and can’t sew for shit, not through lack of trying, but lack of skill, and couldn’t dream of creating a costume from scratch. There’s plenty of cosplayers half my age who eclipse me in terms of skill. And that’s great. There’s room for everyone of all levels, from people whose cosplay consists of matching store-bought clothing with their favorite character, to people who sew body suits, to people who manufacture entire dragons from worbia and everyone in between. However you show your love for a character it’s great and if anyone looks down on you for ‘not trying hard enough’ then they’re the ones that are open for criticism, not you. 

Short version: The real ‘heroes of cosplay’ are each and every one who gives it a go.


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It seems to me that a character cannot remain static, even in an ongoing open-ended publishing format like comics. If you freeze a character into a certain set of parameters, usually for convenience - of other writers, of readers, of merchandisers, whatever - then before long the character runs the risk of becoming sterile. Writers - and, ultimately, readers - may stop thinking of the character as a vital, real, three-dimensional being and instead come to perceive him (or her) as an agglomeration of stock elements - plug ‘em in, wind ‘em up, turn him/her/them loose and put ‘em through their stock paces. Nothing changes, nothing grows. Stories may still be technically exciting, but they’ve lost all their heart; there’s no passion, nothing to excite the readers and hold them interested. And how long then before the writer becomes bored, and the artists, and then ultimately the reader?
Extract from Chris Claremont’s 1987 introduction to the collected edition of 'Wolverine' (somewhat ironically, given the last decades of stagnation for the character).

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Okay, not going to quote specific Marvel vs. DC memes, but…

dekuuna:

angelophile:

Hey, do you think maybe we could stop with the smugness when talking about Marvel Studios?

Yes, DC have completely failed to find a vehicle for Wonder Woman and expressed they thought she was difficult to bring to the big screen. Meanwhile, Marvel Studios are due to release a movie in which a talking raccoon and tree are central characters. LOL, right?

<cut for repetition>

I agree with most of this but there are a few things I feel I should point out?
I don’t think that you can call Joss Whedon being proud of the line “mewling quim” reintroducing an archaic gendered insult into usage. It’s not like there wasn’t a context for it and it’s not like it’s exactly spread like wildfire in pop culture or anything. It was a line that fit the character of Loki considering the shakespearean motif that the MCUs asgardians have and it was delivered very well. Most of all it wasn’t framed in a positive light at all - Loki is a villain and, no matter how many fans declare him sympathetic, a pretty nasty and immoral one. His usage of the word isn’t an endorsement of it. And of course, shortly after he spits that line out, Natasha completely undermines his dominance in the scene.

The only other thing is that you are discussing Marvel Studios, and Marvel Studios are what people generally tout as being superior. Which means that the X-men movies and Andrew Garfield’s idea for a bisexual Peter aren’t really relevant. Marvel Studios isn’t guilty of killing off any black characters early on, but Nick Fury, Rhodey, Sam Wilson and Heimdall are all pretty great characters. 

Honestly, I don’t think we should stop with the smugness around Marvel Studios because, in my eyes at least, their movies are leaps and bounds better than DC’s. Characters are better realized and source material is better treated. Smugness around the main MCU being more inclusive of minorities? Uhh, no. If that exists anywhere, it should stop. Marvel should, in my opinion, make it’s priorities be a Captain Marvel movie and a Black Panther movie. Carol is fantastic and iconic and the fact that there exists a superhero who is like batman only smarter, cooler, with a more interesting background and black and this superhero doesn’t have his own movie yet is a fucking traaavesty. And Cap should be bi for reasons involving sam Marvel should include more of it’s fantastic LGBT+ characters asap.

It sucks that the bisexual/lesbian couple of Moondragon and Phyla-Vell doesn’t seem to be in the new Guardians of the Galaxy movie, but… Moondragon is Drax’s daughter and pretty important to the Thanos story-line. She has to appear eventually, right?

Just my thoughts. 

Regarding the “mewling quim” line, I actually included the link to the interview where Whedon said this:

RDA: What do you feel is the greatest achievement of “the Avoiders”?

JW: Getting “mewling quim” out there to the masses.

I’d actually forgotten about the exclusion of Moondragon and Phyla-Vell from the Guardians of the Galaxy movie until you mentioned it. 


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Okay, not going to quote specific Marvel vs. DC memes, but…

northstarfan:

angelophile:

Hey, do you think maybe we could stop with the smugness when talking about Marvel Studios?

Yes, DC have completely failed to find a vehicle for Wonder Woman and expressed they thought she was difficult to bring to the big screen. Meanwhile, Marvel Studios are due to release a movie in which a talking raccoon and tree are central characters. LOL, right?

Except, wait, amidst all those recent announcements, how many actually confirmed movies are Marvel making with title characters that are women?

Ummm… Let me give you some clues. It’s the exact same number as DC. It rhymes with ‘hero’.

Marvel have recently announced that Peggy Carter will get her own TV spin-off. Jessica Jones and Luke Cage are already slated. Meanwhile, DC are producing Gotham, focused almost exclusively on white males. Reason to feel smug, perhaps?

Or perhaps not. The X-men films that bear Marvel’s name have been filled with erasure of canonically LGBTQ characters and literally acted out the “black dude dies first” trope. Marvel Studios and their actors have been quite happy to queer bait like it was going out of fashion, but showing an actual non-straight character in a visible role? Oh, hell no, not going to happen, even if Andrew Garfield wants it to. Instead, the only onscreen confirmed LGBT characters in the cinematic Marvel Universe? Punchlines.

Meanwhile, DC busily commission another series about a  white, cis male. Although, you know, John Constantine is canonically bisexual, so there’s that. And DC’s TV output may not be quite so focused on straight white males as first appearances may suggest. They have a Black Canary who’s visibly bisexual in Arrow, along with Nyssa Al Ghul. Then there’s LGBTQ characters Pied Piper and Renee Montoya due to appear as regulars on Flash and Gotham, respectively, along with hearing about an enlarged role for Crispus Allen too. And Lana Lang not being just another white redhead in their TV universe. However, there’s no avoiding that this is set against the terrible whitewashing of the Nolan Batman movies. 

And elsewhere Marvel are populating their cinematic universe with characters who aren’t the traditional white male. Hooray, right? Maybe a reason to be self-congratulatory! But with one hand they give and with the other take away. Whedon is apparently busy erasing the Maximoffs’ Romany heritage in order to make them white British and is extremely proud of reintroducing an archaic gendered insult into usage. And, you know what? Whedon’s not alone. Marvel have been quite happy hiring a bunch of other people who have said and done some really, really gross shit, while at the same time screwing over at least one female director so badly, the female lead on the same movie was supposedly desperate to get out of contract.

Meanwhile, Marvel’s flagship TV output so far has been Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., which has literally featured a NAZI as a central character, and while DC’s TV shows may have a number of LGBTQ characters appearing, precisely one has appeared briefly in cameo in Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. (Not that her sexuality was ever acknowledged.) And she got shot and killed by the NAZI. Nice message to send, that.

So, short version? Both of the big two have done some things right. Marvel could be applauded for some of their choices. But to run around pretending that they’re representing the golden age of diversity when looking at their actual output…? Implying they’re so far ahead of anyone else in the genre that they can be supremely pleased with themselves…? Really?

Maybe they are better. But they’ve got a fuck long way to go before they, or their fans, should be loudly patting themselves on the back.

While Black Canary may be visibly bisexual, Guggenheim has outright said they’re not going to use the big, scary b-word for the character, so at least half a point docked there.

Also, the intro and backstory for Quicksilver in DoFP sounds like a rip-off of Northstar’s — a speester who’s a disgraced athlete introduced via his past connections to Wolverine. So what do you think the odds of actually getting Marvel’s best-known gay mutant on the screen in the wake of that? Yeah, pretty much zilch.

So no, not terribly pleased with any of the above TV/movie franchises on the representation front.

I was aware of Guggenheim’s comments, which is why I said visibly bisexual rather than openly bisexual, yeah…

I wasn’t aware of the DoFP thing, probably because I have no interest in the movie after X-men: First Class. But I’m not surprised to hear it. I imagine the part may even have been written as Northstar, then nameswitched to Quicksilver as a dick measuring exercise between the team behind that movie and Avengers 2. 


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Okay, not going to quote specific Marvel vs. DC memes, but…

Hey, do you think maybe we could stop with the smugness when talking about Marvel Studios?

Yes, DC have completely failed to find a vehicle for Wonder Woman and expressed they thought she was difficult to bring to the big screen. Meanwhile, Marvel Studios are due to release a movie in which a talking raccoon and tree are central characters. LOL, right?

Except, wait, amidst all those recent announcements, how many actually confirmed movies are Marvel making with title characters that are women?

Ummm… Let me give you some clues. It’s the exact same number as DC. It rhymes with ‘hero’.

Marvel have recently announced that Peggy Carter will get her own TV spin-off. Jessica Jones and Luke Cage are already slated. Meanwhile, DC are producing Gotham, focused almost exclusively on white males. Reason to feel smug, perhaps?

Or perhaps not. The X-men films that bear Marvel’s name have been filled with erasure of canonically LGBTQ characters and literally acted out the “black dude dies first” trope. Marvel Studios and their actors have been quite happy to queer bait like it was going out of fashion, but showing an actual non-straight character in a visible role? Oh, hell no, not going to happen, even if Andrew Garfield wants it to. Instead, the only onscreen confirmed LGBT characters in the cinematic Marvel Universe? Punchlines.

Meanwhile, DC busily commission another series about a  white, cis male. Although, you know, John Constantine is canonically bisexual, so there’s that. And DC’s TV output may not be quite so focused on straight white males as first appearances may suggest. They have a Black Canary who’s visibly bisexual in Arrow, along with Nyssa Al Ghul. Then there’s LGBTQ characters Pied Piper and Renee Montoya due to appear as regulars on Flash and Gotham, respectively, along with hearing about an enlarged role for Crispus Allen too. And Lana Lang not being just another white redhead in their TV universe. However, there’s no avoiding that this is set against the terrible whitewashing of the Nolan Batman movies. 

And elsewhere Marvel are populating their cinematic universe with characters who aren’t the traditional white male. Hooray, right? Maybe a reason to be self-congratulatory! But with one hand they give and with the other take away. Whedon is apparently busy erasing the Maximoffs’ Romany heritage in order to make them white British and is extremely proud of reintroducing an archaic gendered insult into usage. And, you know what? Whedon’s not alone. Marvel have been quite happy hiring a bunch of other people who have said and done some really, really gross shit, while at the same time screwing over at least one female director so badly, the female lead on the same movie was supposedly desperate to get out of contract.

Meanwhile, Marvel’s flagship TV output so far has been Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., which has literally featured a NAZI as a central character, and while DC’s TV shows may have a number of LGBTQ characters appearing, precisely one has appeared briefly in cameo in Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. (Not that her sexuality was ever acknowledged.) And she got shot and killed by the NAZI. Nice message to send, that.

So, short version? Both of the big two have done some things right. Marvel could be applauded for some of their choices. But to run around pretending that they’re representing the golden age of diversity when looking at their actual output…? Implying they’re so far ahead of anyone else in the genre that they can be supremely pleased with themselves…? Really?

Maybe they are better. But they’ve got a fuck long way to go before they, or their fans, should be loudly patting themselves on the back.


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character: *blatantly evil, actively attempts to kill the main characters*
fandom: poor misunderstood bb! you're so cute
other character: *does something that's entirely reasonable from their POV, unwittingly mildly inconveniencing the main characters*
fandom: DIE, YOU VILE LITTLE PIECE OF SHIT

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In pretty much every social justice debate, once things have flared up and we’re off at the races, someone in the conversation is going to say something about how people are just mad to be mad, something something lynch mobs (with varied or veiled phrasing), blah blah the negativity of the internet, and yada yada some people are just looking to be offended. Sometimes they mean well, sometimes they want to defend their friends, and sometimes they’re just jerks. It happens.

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muhbones:

'then write one' is such a fucking shitty response to the desire for more representation in media

guess what? i write shit that i want to see in media all of the goddamn time

and eight thousand fucking notes on my post is proof i am not alone in this desire

people create these things all of the time

but they are kept quiet, their voices are taken and modified for the status quo

don’t ask us ‘to write one’

ask about what happened after we did and why you’ve never heard of it

(Source: asealuponyourarm)


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creepingmonsterism:

Also how do most of the adaptations manage to avoid everything that was important and revolutionary about Chris Claremont’s X-Men stories (like the focus on female characters and relationships between women and the whole Mystique/Destiny thing) even though they were hugely influential on so much of the rest of pop culture via secondhand influence?


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believeinprongs:

jaimelannistersgoldhand:

Hatred toward Cho Chang and Lavender Brown and adoration toward Draco Malfoy and Severus Snape, a study in misogyny, sexism and double-standards by me. 

those tags are beautiful

(Source: thesmokingpossum)


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