Love, Blood & Rhetoric
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geniusbee:

I realized this last night and I’m a fucking nerd but honestly

it helped me to think about it like this 

because I don’t wanna be on the side of the Wall


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sannam:

Some post-apocalypse cancellation mornings.


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gigapower:

Pacific Rim B-Movie style poster

By Richard Davis for Blurppy.com’s Poster Posse Project #3

gigapower:

Pacific Rim B-Movie style poster

By Richard Davis for Blurppy.com’s Poster Posse Project #3


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cubewatermelon:

I JUST NOW noticed that Shirow Miwa drew this amazing Pacific Rim fanart and I can’t take it.

My herooooo


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allnewmutants:

Dani Moonstar by Leandro Fernandez

allnewmutants:

Dani Moonstar by Leandro Fernandez


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Danielle Moonstar by Andrew Robinson (Source)

Danielle Moonstar by Andrew Robinson (Source)


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davestokes:

Cleaned up scan of the Dani Moonstar sketch from this week

davestokes:

Cleaned up scan of the Dani Moonstar sketch from this week


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71hitcombo:

Dani Moonstar drawn by Jeff Stokely and colored by Chad Lawrence

71hitcombo:

Dani Moonstar drawn by Jeff Stokely and colored by Chad Lawrence


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The Marx Brothers by Drew Friedman (Source)

The Marx Brothers by Drew Friedman (Source)


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ridgerooms:

IN WHICH I SHARE MY SUPER-SECRET, SUPER-EMBARRASSING PROCESS OF MAKING SUPER-FUN, SUPER-COOL ART!
Few people ever see this! I mean almost no one! Because it’s so embarrassing! But people ask me about my process all the time, so I’m sharing how I make most of my art prints. You too can be a starving artist at home in your spare time if you follow these easy steps!
Step 1 (frame 1 & 2): Super-messy rough draft in Illustrator that I lovingly refer to as Blobby Mockup™. It looks like a child drew it because I draw that step with a mouse (which I totally suck at) as opposed to my Wacom tablet which I use for the final illustration. This step is to mess around and decide the basic layout of my design without wasting a bunch of sketch paper.
Step 2 (frame 3): Once I have ol’ Blobby looking somewhat cohesive, I (sometimes) do a full drawing in pencil, then scan to overlay as a guide to the final drawing. I used to do this for all prints, but now that my process has evolved and I’m getting quicker/smoother with my cartoon style, often times now I just skip this step and go right to working on the final drawing, thus keeping the entire process in Illustrator. (Plus, I need a new scanner and can’t really afford one right now, so …)
Step 3 (frame 4): Start shaping the final drawing in Illustrator using the scan as a guide. One of my favorite steps of a project (possibly THE favorite step) is when I feel I’ve gotten enough from the pencil drawing and can delete the scan layer and just start having fun with final shaping, coloring and details.
Step 4-1000 (frame 5-9): Revise, revise, revise, revise, REVISE, changing colors, moving things around, closing Chico’s eyes, giving him a left leg, until my hand falls off, my eyes are fried and burning out of their sockets, and my Wacom tablet has desperately begged of me "PLEASE, NO MORE, YOU INDECISIVE, HELLISH TASKMASTER!"
Step 1001 (frame 10): Open the program back up and sneak in a few more nudges. In this case, changing Groucho’s smoke from red to green.
A few notes:• I hesitated to show the first frame due to people probably thinking "It would’ve been so much cooler with their name at the bottom!!!" And yes! It would’ve been fun! But the decision was made early on to avoid that branding treatment in order to stay away from copyright gray areas.• This piece was made in the early days of developing my current cartoon style of prints, although if I drew it now, I’d mostly still do it this way (for example, gradient shading as opposed to all hard solid vector shading) because I was going for a cross between modern cartooning and ’30s art deco style. I might not have done the noses, though. (And yes, not even Groucho’s!)• I don’t know if people even notice my trademarks (such as my ban on noses that I mentioned above), but this has the most prominent usage of one of my favorite recurring visuals: having a plume of smoke that rises and breaks the frame. (Twice, I’ve even snuck that into the glow layers on prints.)• Fun fact: the highlight in Zeppo’s hair forms the initials “WM” which was a nod to my friend (and classic-movie-buff) Will McKinley, for his fine detective work on tracking down the correct spelling of “Tootsie Frootsie” from a published script he had. I often sneak little jokes into my work for friends.
This limited-edition print was originally made for Bottleneck Gallery’s “The Gang’s All Here” show. A few of those are still available through my shop.

ridgerooms:

IN WHICH I SHARE MY SUPER-SECRET, SUPER-EMBARRASSING PROCESS OF MAKING SUPER-FUN, SUPER-COOL ART!

Few people ever see this! I mean almost no one! Because it’s so embarrassing! But people ask me about my process all the time, so I’m sharing how I make most of my art prints. You too can be a starving artist at home in your spare time if you follow these easy steps!

Step 1 (frame 1 & 2): Super-messy rough draft in Illustrator that I lovingly refer to as Blobby Mockup™. It looks like a child drew it because I draw that step with a mouse (which I totally suck at) as opposed to my Wacom tablet which I use for the final illustration. This step is to mess around and decide the basic layout of my design without wasting a bunch of sketch paper.

Step 2 (frame 3): Once I have ol’ Blobby looking somewhat cohesive, I (sometimes) do a full drawing in pencil, then scan to overlay as a guide to the final drawing. I used to do this for all prints, but now that my process has evolved and I’m getting quicker/smoother with my cartoon style, often times now I just skip this step and go right to working on the final drawing, thus keeping the entire process in Illustrator. (Plus, I need a new scanner and can’t really afford one right now, so …)

Step 3 (frame 4): Start shaping the final drawing in Illustrator using the scan as a guide. One of my favorite steps of a project (possibly THE favorite step) is when I feel I’ve gotten enough from the pencil drawing and can delete the scan layer and just start having fun with final shaping, coloring and details.

Step 4-1000 (frame 5-9): Revise, revise, revise, revise, REVISE, changing colors, moving things around, closing Chico’s eyes, giving him a left leg, until my hand falls off, my eyes are fried and burning out of their sockets, and my Wacom tablet has desperately begged of me "PLEASE, NO MORE, YOU INDECISIVE, HELLISH TASKMASTER!"

Step 1001 (frame 10): Open the program back up and sneak in a few more nudges. In this case, changing Groucho’s smoke from red to green.

A few notes:
• I hesitated to show the first frame due to people probably thinking "It would’ve been so much cooler with their name at the bottom!!!" And yes! It would’ve been fun! But the decision was made early on to avoid that branding treatment in order to stay away from copyright gray areas.
• This piece was made in the early days of developing my current cartoon style of prints, although if I drew it now, I’d mostly still do it this way (for example, gradient shading as opposed to all hard solid vector shading) because I was going for a cross between modern cartooning and ’30s art deco style. I might not have done the noses, though. (And yes, not even Groucho’s!)
• I don’t know if people even notice my trademarks (such as my ban on noses that I mentioned above), but this has the most prominent usage of one of my favorite recurring visuals: having a plume of smoke that rises and breaks the frame. (Twice, I’ve even snuck that into the glow layers on prints.)
• Fun fact: the highlight in Zeppo’s hair forms the initials “WM” which was a nod to my friend (and classic-movie-buff) Will McKinley, for his fine detective work on tracking down the correct spelling of “Tootsie Frootsie” from a published script he had. I often sneak little jokes into my work for friends.

This limited-edition print was originally made for Bottleneck Gallery’s “The Gang’s All Here” show. A few of those are still available through my shop.


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thesanityclause:

It depends on the day, but usually it’s Groucho or Harpo.Other classics include:"Get away from that tree before it dies.""Why don’t you go home to your wife? I’ll tell you what, I’ll go home to your wife and outside of the improvement she’ll never know the difference."

thesanityclause:

It depends on the day, but usually it’s Groucho or Harpo.
Other classics include:
"Get away from that tree before it dies."
"Why don’t you go home to your wife? I’ll tell you what, I’ll go home to your wife and outside of the improvement she’ll never know the difference."


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Rictor and Boom Boom by Jon Bogdanove (Source)

Rictor and Boom Boom by Jon Bogdanove (Source)


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petervnguyen:

Tic tic boom! You know it’s the 1980s when you need overall for your high waist pants but you’re okay with one shoulder being exposed #boomboom #xterminators (at Urban Seoul)

petervnguyen:

Tic tic boom! You know it’s the 1980s when you need overall for your high waist pants but you’re okay with one shoulder being exposed #boomboom #xterminators (at Urban Seoul)