Angelophile
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Claiming there is no other life in the universe is like scooping up some water, looking at the cup and claiming there are no whales in the ocean
Neil deGrasse Tyson in response to “Aliens can’t exist because we haven’t found them yet” (via unusual-entities)

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theybuildbuildings:

whydouwantaname:

moniquill:

universalequalityisinevitable:

Robert Sapolsky about his study of the Keekorok baboon troop from National Geographic’s Stress: Portrait of a Killer.

#I’m not saying we should cull all alpha broskis      #but…     

I am. I’m gonna go ahead and say that.

Interesting for various therories.

Did some research, here are my conclusions: So, first of all, this dude has the same undergrad degree as me. Baller. Despite the hair, hes also a top dog at stanford and totally legit. Second, yes, this is science. The implications are perhaps taken a bit far, but the underlying mechanisms are not only legitimate, but tried and true. Another experiment has demonstrated primates will instill fears and taboos across gerenations (specifically, climbing a platform for delicious food when in the first generation it elicited a shock, even though there was no shock in subsequent generations.) If aggression led to death, or if aggression was never an option, there is no reason to believe it also couldn’t be taught as wrong or unacceptable. What’s even MORE amazing about this situation is that in baboons, males migrate and females stay. What this means is, the lack of aggression IS NOT GENETIC. NEW MALES EMIGRATE TO THIS GROUP. New males with new genes, not descened from the original TB-infected clan at all. Once they join, though, they LEARN not to be aggressive. Other clans in the area, where these males originate, ARE STILL AGGRESSIVE. The females who stay (and the young males and new alphas) are TRAINING new members to be nice. And it’s working. Also awesome is that the cortisol (stress hormone, which can cause chronic disease) levels in this clan is WAY lower than in other clans in the area. So it’s likely that they’re healthier, too. BOO YA

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geekographer:

Vintage Inspired Mad Scientist Warning Posters

Fresh off the walls of Walter’s abandoned Harvard lab, these Fringe Science warning posters key in to the perils of many experimental future sciences. From Cloning and Genetic Mutation to Teleportation and Thought Extraction, you can own the entire set or pick out some of your favorites to display proudly on your own laboratory walls.

Designs by The Geekerie - Etsy  |  Facebook  |  Twitter


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mommapolitico:

oliveseraphim:

When scientists get too honest

> I would love to see more science posts on Tumblr. I particularly liked, “The postdoc who did all the work has since left to start a bakery.”

Well scientists are still human after all.

The last one slayed me omg

#2 tho GPOY

Why am I reblog going this? Because I am a geeky, nerdy political wonk. Even politicos love funny science references…

(Source: theamericankid)


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fuckyeahethnicwomen:

traciglee:

Thirteen-year-old Lauren Rojas decided to send Hello Kitty 100,000 feet into space with a high-altitude balloon. Here are her recorded results.
Science!

 Seventh grade girl builds rocket, sends Hello Kitty into the upper atmosphere

A seventh grader has made good on the dreams of middle schoolers everywhere by sending Hello Kitty into the stratosphere. According to ABC News:

Lauren Rojas, a 12-year-old from Antioch, Calif., got the idea after seeing a television commercial in which a balloon was launched into the sky. She thought she could do the same with her Hello Kitty doll. She would test air pressure and temperature at high altitude for her school’s science fair.

And so she did. With these incredible results. (via io9 Seventh grade girl builds rocket, sends Hello Kitty into the upper atmosphere)
So. Cool. 
Also more links: http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/observations/2013/02/04/watch-this-amazing-12-year-old-launch-a-hello-kitty-into-space/

fuckyeahethnicwomen:

traciglee:

Thirteen-year-old Lauren Rojas decided to send Hello Kitty 100,000 feet into space with a high-altitude balloon. Here are her recorded results.

Science!

Seventh grade girl builds rocket, sends Hello Kitty into the upper atmosphere

A seventh grader has made good on the dreams of middle schoolers everywhere by sending Hello Kitty into the stratosphere. According to ABC News:

Lauren Rojas, a 12-year-old from Antioch, Calif., got the idea after seeing a television commercial in which a balloon was launched into the sky. She thought she could do the same with her Hello Kitty doll. She would test air pressure and temperature at high altitude for her school’s science fair.

And so she did. With these incredible results. (via io9 Seventh grade girl builds rocket, sends Hello Kitty into the upper atmosphere)

So. Cool. 

Also more links: http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/observations/2013/02/04/watch-this-amazing-12-year-old-launch-a-hello-kitty-into-space/


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limnion:

thescienceofreality:

Thriving since 1960, my garden in a bottle: Seedling sealed in its own ecosystem and watered just once in 53 years.

To look at this flourishing mass of plant life you’d think David Latimer was a green-fingered genius. Truth be told, however, his bottle garden – now almost in its 53rd year – hasn’t taken up much of his time. In fact, on the last occasion he watered it Ted Heath was Prime Minister and Richard Nixon was in the White House.

For the last 40 years it has been completely sealed from the outside world. But the indoor variety of spiderworts (or Tradescantia, to give the plant species its scientific Latin name) within has thrived, filling its globular bottle home with healthy foliage.

Yesterday Mr Latimer, 80, said: ‘It’s 6ft from a window so gets a bit of sunlight. It grows towards the light so it gets turned round every so often so it grows evenly. ‘Otherwise, it’s the definition of low-maintenance. I’ve never pruned it, it just seems to have grown to the limits of the bottle.’ 

The bottle garden has created its own miniature ecosystem. Despite being cut off from the outside world, because it is still absorbing light it can photosynthesize  the process by which plants convert sunlight into the energy they need to grow.”

So how does it work exactly?

Bottle gardens work because their sealed space creates an entirely self-sufficient ecosystem in which plants can survive by using photosynthesis to recycle nutrients.

The only external input needed to keep the plant going is light, since this provides it with the energy it needs to create its own food and continue to grow.

Light shining on the leaves of the plant is absorbed by proteins containing chlorophylls (a green pigment).

Some of that light energy is stored in the form of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), a molecule that stores energy. The rest is used to remove electrons from the water being absorbed from the soil through the plant’s roots.

These electrons then become ‘free’ - and are used in chemical reactions that convert carbon dioxide into carbohydrates, releasing oxygen.

This photosynthesis process is the opposite of the cellular respiration that occurs in other organisms, including humans, where carbohydrates containing energy react with oxygen to produce carbon dioxide, water, and release chemical energy.

But the eco-system also uses cellular respiration to break down decaying material shed by the plant. In this part of the process, bacteria inside the soil of the bottle garden absorbs the plant’s waste oxygen and releasing carbon dioxide which the growing plant can reuse.

And, of course, at night, when there is no sunlight to drive photosynthesis, the plant will also use cellular respiration to keep itself alive by breaking down the stored nutrients.

Because the bottle garden is a closed environment, that means its water cycle is also a self-contained process.

The water in the bottle gets taken up by plants’ roots, is released into the air during transpiration, condenses down into the potting mixture, where the cycle begins again.”

Read more…

 This is so unbelievably cool.


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